How To Spray Paint A Round Object?

How To Spray Paint A Round ObjectSo, you’ve learned how to paint flat spots and it’s time to shake things up a little. If you are wondering how to paint a round object, then you are definitely in the right place.  In my opinion, the easiest way to spray paint a round object is to put it in a pot or an old vase and place it in the center of a revolving tray or stand. This lets you spray the object quite evenly by rotating the stand and keeps drips and runs to a minimum.

In this article I’ll give you some spray painting tips to help you to avoid some pitfalls. We’ll talk about painting Styrofoam and rubber balls and offer alternative paints where spray painting is not going to be a good fit.

Let’s get started with Styrofoam balls and then we can go on from there.

Can I spray paint Styrofoam balls?Can I spray paint Styrofoam balls

With Styrofoam balls, spray paint is actually not going to be a good idea. The problem that you’ll run into has to do with the enamel component of most commercial spray paints. This enamel is actually corrosive to Styrofoam, and so if you try to paint it with most spray paints then your Styrofoam will react and likely dissolve slowly before your eyes.

Yikes!

Your best bet for painting Styrofoam, at least in my experience, is going to be by using acrylics. The Styrofoam is rather porous, so it will definitely take a few coats, but it should look quite nice when you are done. You could also use any other latex or oil-based paints to get the job done and the easiest way to go about it is generally just poking a stick into the ball so that you can clip it in place to give it a nice, even brushing before you let it dry.

So… Styrofoam and spray paint are a definite no-go. Acrylics are going to be the best option in this scenario.

Can I spray paint a rubber ball?

Can I spray paint a rubber ballYes, you most certainly can! While latex-based paints and enamel paints are used more often with rubber, spray paint works a treat as well… if you use the right kind (more on this shortly). You’ll likely want to place it in a pot, as described previously, and on a rotating platform in order to get an even coat fairly easily.

If you don’t have a rotating platform, you can still place it in a pot on some newspapers and using short, quick sprays you can get a fairly even coat with a patience and moving around.

The trick is going to be using a light hand and it does take a while to learn how to do this, so be patient with the process and you’ll pick it up before you know it!

One thing that can help you out quite a bit is using spray paints that are better suited for rubber and I’ve got a few of those that I’ll share with you in the next section!

What is the best spray paint to use on rubber?What is the best spray paint to use on rubber

The best spray paints to use are going to be be the ‘plasti dip’ type sprays which you can find from companies such as Rustoleum or Performix. These are technically spray paints, as they do paint the rubber but they actually created a rubberized coating.

This is going to work out with something like a rubber ball much better, because regular spray paint is likely going to chip and crack fairly quickly with the kind of use that is the everyday life of a rubber ball! With a plasti-dip coat, you can color the ball as you like and it might even be just a little more bouncy!

As far as how long it will take to dry, you’ll want to doublecheck your label and we’ve also got some very specific drying information for you https://paintingbuzz.com/how-long-does-it-take-spray-paint-to-dry-complete-guide/) here ( that should prove quite useful! Generally, plasti-dips are fairly fast, and you are looking at 4 hours until they are fully dry and about 15 minutes before they are dry enough for adding a second coat!

Some final words

Today I’ve given you a few tips and tricks for when you are spray painting round objects. As a quick recap, a vase and some sort of rotating turntable is always going to be best for painting something round, unless of course it is Styrofoam (which spray paint will dissolve!). Finally, with rubber, plasti-dips are going to be the best fit so that your newly sprayed color won’t crack or break anytime soon.

I hope that you’ve enjoyed the tips today and while we’re on the subject, you can also get a few nice tips at a 3rd party you can find here. Take a peek and see what you think!

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